This Month

Message from the National Seminar Planning Committee

Introducing Our New Business Membership – Coming Oct. 1

Video of the Month

Next Member-Chat

Members-only Site to Remain Open to All through June 30

Handbell Happy Hours Continue on Tuesdays & Thursdays

Brian’s Music Notes

SUBSCRIBE TO E-NOTES


National Events

GO HERE to find out more about all our national events.

Subscribe to our YouTube Channel to receive notifications about new videos and live streams.


 

Become a Sustaining Partner

Upgrade your membership to SUSTAINING PARTNER and play an important role in ensuring the future of Handbell Musicians of America. As a SUSTAINING PARTNER

  • You are CONNECTED to the handbell community
  • You are IN PARTNERSHIP with other handbell musicians
  • You are NURTURED through education and resources

Learn More


hf-logo-260px Help build a pension for the Guild, by contributing to the HERITAGE FUND

Announcements

HANDBELL MUSICIANS OF AMERICA MAILING ADDRESSES

Please note that any PAYMENTS sent to the Guild should now go to the following address:

Handbell Musicians of America PO Box 221047 Louisville, KY 40252

This includes membership renewal, contributions, event registration payments, invoice payments, etc.

All GENERAL CORRESPONDENCE that DOES NOT include a check payment should should be sent to:

Handbell Musicians of America 201 E. Fifth Street Suite 1900-1025 Cincinnati, OH 45202

A Message from the National Seminar Planning Committee

Greetings friends,

These uncertain times have been difficult for all our members. However, they have also encouraged creativity, leading us all to try new things and find new ways to connect, hold rehearsals, perform, and communicate with our fellow handbell musicians. With many events and performances canceled or postponed, we have struggled with how best to proceed with plans for National Seminar and the associated events, Master Class and Distinctly Teen.

Our goal has always been to protect the health and safety of our members while continuing to offer high-quality events and resources to the handbell community. We also must balance that goal with our responsibility to protect Handbell Musicians of America from adverse legal action and financial penalties for not fulfilling contractual obligations. We appreciate everyone’s patience and understanding as we work to develop the best response to these challenges.

HMA has been working with the hotel to mutually agree upon contractual obligations. We are actively redesigning the event, thus allowing us to avoid significant cash penalties while keeping our members’ health and safety a priority. And, this new offering will be flexible and agile enough to change, if the situation requires that.

Sadly, we have had to make the painful decision to cancel Distinctly Teen and Master Class, and the registrants have been notified. However, we are very close to a resolution regarding National Seminar and will announce our event plans by June 1.

We thank you for your continued support and look forward to the day when we can meet again in person and make music together.

We remain united in our musical art.

The National Seminar Planning Committee
Jennifer Cauhorn
Gary Bynum
KC Congdon
Brian Parrott
Wendy Ransom
Margi Zearley

Return to top

Introducing our New Business Membership – Coming Oct. 1

Handbell businesses and individuals who perform handbell-related services are an integral part of the handbell world. We are pleased to introduce a new Business Membership with all the benefits you are used to with the current HIC membership, plus some new ones at a new, lower fee.

This new membership will include all the benefits you’re used to receiving plus some new ones, including e-blasts sent by HMA on behalf of the business; a new, enhanced online buyer’s guide that the member can manage with rich text and photos; inclusion in an annual printed buyer’s guide in Overtones with contact information, photo, and description; and more.

Return to top

Video of the Month

We all know of handbell musicians’ fondness for boomwhackers. Aidan Fozard has strung up a set of them to create a “boomafone” and performed “Under the Sea,” with a little added Cajon. In his description for the video, he writes: As Sebastian says, “Ariel, listen to me. The human world, it’s a mess.” Why not enjoy a Boomafone instead!

Return to top

Next Member-Chat

Music for Handbells & Other Instruments

Saturday, May 30, 2020
5:00 p.m. Eastern

Join handbell musician Beau Lochte from Baltimore Maryland as he describes the wide variety of instruments that he has paired with handbells.  Beau directs church and community handbell choirs in the Baltimore area.

Please note: While Member-Chats are normally a members-only benefit, during this time that we have opened up our members-only site to all handbell musicians, non-members may register to attend as well.

Member-Chat Details

Return to top

Members-Only Site Open to Non-Members 

Extended through June 30

We hope you all are staying healthy and coping well during this time that most Americans have been asked to stay at home to help slow and eventually stop the spread of COVID-19.

To help ease the anxiety and isolation of social distancing and staying inside, Handbell Musicians of America has extended the opening of our members-only site to all handbell musicians, members and non-members alike, through June 30. There you will find the online edition of our quarterly journal, Overtones, archives of Member-Notes and Member-Chats, and a wealth of other handbell resources, all for you to enjoy during this time.

Please stay United Through Our Musical Art and, above all, and stay well!

Visit Members’ Site

Return to top

Handbell Happy Hours Continuing on Tuesdays and Thursdays

Looking for a fun way to help ease the isolation of self-quarantine and social distancing during the COVID-19 pandemic? Join us each Tuesday and Thursday for a casual, virtual chat with your handbell friends.

Happy Hour Times:
Tuesdays – 4:00 P.M. Eastern (1 P.M. Pacific)
Thursdays – 7:00 P.M. Eastern (4 P.M. Pacific)

Use this time to check in with each other, share ideas for staying musically connected, and discuss your love for all things handbell. No need to pre-register, just follow the link each week. https://meetings.ringcentral.com/j/1482015406

Sessions will last up to an hour. Have ideas for topics to discuss on these chats? Just email your suggestion to info@handbellmusicians.org. We will continue our Handbell Happy Hours as long as they are useful and valuable to our members.

So grab your favorite snack and beverage and join us online!

Return to top

Brian’s Music Notes

with Brian Childers

“Lo, How a Rose E’re Blooming” Arr. Sandra Eithun

AG35228; Level 2-; 3-5 Octaves Bells; Originally Released Fall 2004
Liturgical Season: Advent

Usage

This lovely setting of “Lo, How a Rose E’re Blooming” will find a welcome place in Advent services of most faith traditions. You can hear a recording, preview the music and order it for your bell choir from Lorenz: Order “Lo, How a Rose E’re Blooming”

Overview

Sandra does a wonderful job of pairing the tunes “Lo, How a Rose E’re Blooming” and “To a Wild Rose.” Her writing is clear and accessible, making this arrangement within the grasp of nearly any group. Following a simple chordal pattern and utilizing minimal bell changes and techniques, bell choirs can easily add this to gem to their repertoire with just a few rehearsals. 

Notes from Sandra

“When I was a young piano student, I always loved Edward MacDowell’s ‘To a Wild Rose.’ It was just a lovely, relaxing & thoughtful piece that was fun to play again and again. In contemplating scoring ‘Lo, How a Rose’ for handbells, I just messed around in my head with juxtaposing the two “rose-themed” pieces. I had to tweak the tunes here and there to make them work harmonically, but for the most part it wasn’t an issue. I did want to maintain the feeling of calm within the entirety of the piece.”

When asked about special suggestions for directors as they prepare this work, she replied to keep this setting tranquil and moving along.

What you should know about Sandra Eithun
  •         Sandra’s introduction to bells: “When I was hired to work in music ministry at my church in 1993, there were handbells stored in the basement of the church, as the director had been killed in a car accident a few years prior.  I took a handbell workshop sponsored by Bill Alexander and Strikepoint, and I was hooked!”
  •         What brought you to composing for bells:“I loved to do composition in my college years, mostly for flute or piano.  I thought I’d try my hand at bells since we did not have a huge budget at the time for new music. I never put my name on the music so that I could get unbiased feedback. Not that my young ringers paid attention to names on scores, but I did like being able to use my church group as a laboratory!”
  •         First Published composition: Gethsemane’s Prayer 
  •         Tell us about how you write: Today, I do write at the piano with my desktop computer.  Back in my college years, I always used staff paper. Occasionally, when I’m not in front of my piano, if I hear a tune in my head I’ll write it down in solfege until I have time to develop it later on. I have a home office, but I do write a lot in my head pretty much anywhere…driving, walking, trying to fall asleep (which is not always good because you can get stuck with an earworm!).”
  •       What you love most about composing: “I love that it’s different every day.  I love the challenge of trying to take a familiar hymn that you’ve heard over and over in several settings, and making something entirely different out of it.  It feels good to be able to inspire or move another person. My family is supportive of my composing…they like it that I wear my earphones!”
More info about Sandra
  • Sandra is married with four children and three grandchildren
  • She loves to cook, walk, and ice skate.
  • She enjoys working with church groups and her Silver Lake College group.
  • All four of her children were musicians throughout their school years. Mitchell Eithun has been very active in handbells and has several titles already in print. 
  • She admits she gets pretty animated in front of her TV during Green Bay Packer games!
“Lo, How A Rose” Background from Hymnary.org

Text: This hymn may date back as far as the fifteenth century, though the earliest manuscript was found in St. Alban’s Carthusian monastery in Trier and was dated around 1580. It was first published with twenty-three stanzas in Alte Catholische Geistliche Kirchengesange in 1599. Originally written in German and titled “Es ist ein Ros ensprungen,” the text combines the story of Christ’s birth with the prophecies in Isaiah about the “rose” from the “stem of Jesse.” The second verse originally interpreted “rose” to mean Mary, the mother of Jesus, but in 1609, Michael Praetorius changed the interpretation to point to Christ, thus fitting with the actual Biblical imagery. He then published the hymn with only stanzas one and two and added a harmonization. The first two verses were translated into English by Theodore Baker around 1894.

Tune: Paul Westermeyer writes that the tune ES IST EIN ROS “has the unusual capacity to lend itself equally well to both congregational and choral singing, with and without harmony in both cases” (Let the People Sing, 138). The Psalter Hymnal Handbook describes the harmony and rhythm as “subtle,” so it isn’t necessary to use much, if any, accompaniment. For a quirky folk version, check out Sufjan Steven’s banjo-led recording. Or, if you’re more a fan of rock and roll, Sting has a simple rendition featured in his “Life from Durham Cathedral” concert. There are multiple examples of a capella choral versions – in particular the Montverdi Choir’s German version.

See & Hear the Music

Until next month,

Brian Childers
Music Adviser

Return to top

A Message from the National Seminar Planning Committee

Greetings friends,

These uncertain times have been difficult for all our members. However, they have also encouraged creativity, leading us all to try new things and find new ways to connect, hold rehearsals, perform, and communicate with our fellow handbell musicians. With many events and performances canceled or postponed, we have struggled with how best to proceed with plans for National Seminar and the associated events, Master Class and Distinctly Teen.

Our goal has always been to protect the health and safety of our members while continuing to offer high-quality events and resources to the handbell community. We also must balance that goal with our responsibility to protect Handbell Musicians of America from adverse legal action and financial penalties for not fulfilling contractual obligations. We appreciate everyone’s patience and understanding as we work to develop the best response to these challenges.

HMA has been working with the hotel to mutually agree upon contractual obligations. We are actively redesigning the event, thus allowing us to avoid significant cash penalties while keeping our members’ health and safety a priority. And, this new offering will be flexible and agile enough to change, if the situation requires that.

Sadly, we have had to make the painful decision to cancel Distinctly Teen and Master Class, and the registrants have been notified. However, we are very close to a resolution regarding National Seminar and will announce our event plans by June 1.

We thank you for your continued support and look forward to the day when we can meet again in person and make music together.

We remain united in our musical art.

The National Seminar Planning Committee
Jennifer Cauhorn
Gary Bynum
KC Congdon
Brian Parrott
Wendy Ransom
Margi Zearley

Return to top

Introducing our New Business Membership – Coming Oct. 1

Handbell businesses and individuals who perform handbell-related services are an integral part of the handbell world. We are pleased to introduce a new Business Membership with all the benefits you are used to with the current HIC membership, plus some new ones at a new, lower fee.

This new membership will include all the benefits you’re used to receiving plus some new ones, including e-blasts sent by HMA on behalf of the business; a new, enhanced online buyer’s guide that the member can manage with rich text and photos; inclusion in an annual printed buyer’s guide in Overtones with contact information, photo, and description; and more.

Return to top

Video of the Month

We all know of handbell musicians’ fondness for boomwhackers. Aidan Fozard has strung up a set of them to create a “boomafone” and performed “Under the Sea,” with a little added Cajon. In his description for the video, he writes: As Sebastian says, “Ariel, listen to me. The human world, it’s a mess.” Why not enjoy a Boomafone instead!

Return to top

Next Member-Chat

Music for Handbells & Other Instruments

Saturday, May 30, 2020
5:00 p.m. Eastern

Join handbell musician Beau Lochte from Baltimore Maryland as he describes the wide variety of instruments that he has paired with handbells.  Beau directs church and community handbell choirs in the Baltimore area.

Please note: While Member-Chats are normally a members-only benefit, during this time that we have opened up our members-only site to all handbell musicians, non-members may register to attend as well.

Member-Chat Details

Return to top

Members-Only Site Open to Non-Members 

Extended through June 30

We hope you all are staying healthy and coping well during this time that most Americans have been asked to stay at home to help slow and eventually stop the spread of COVID-19.

To help ease the anxiety and isolation of social distancing and staying inside, Handbell Musicians of America has extended the opening of our members-only site to all handbell musicians, members and non-members alike, through June 30. There you will find the online edition of our quarterly journal, Overtones, archives of Member-Notes and Member-Chats, and a wealth of other handbell resources, all for you to enjoy during this time.

Please stay United Through Our Musical Art and, above all, and stay well!

Visit Members’ Site

Return to top

Handbell Happy Hours Continuing on Tuesdays and Thursdays

Looking for a fun way to help ease the isolation of self-quarantine and social distancing during the COVID-19 pandemic? Join us each Tuesday and Thursday for a casual, virtual chat with your handbell friends.

Happy Hour Times:
Tuesdays – 4:00 P.M. Eastern (1 P.M. Pacific)
Thursdays – 7:00 P.M. Eastern (4 P.M. Pacific)

Use this time to check in with each other, share ideas for staying musically connected, and discuss your love for all things handbell. No need to pre-register, just follow the link each week. https://meetings.ringcentral.com/j/1482015406

Sessions will last up to an hour. Have ideas for topics to discuss on these chats? Just email your suggestion to info@handbellmusicians.org. We will continue our Handbell Happy Hours as long as they are useful and valuable to our members.

So grab your favorite snack and beverage and join us online!

Return to top

Brian’s Music Notes

with Brian Childers

“Lo, How a Rose E’re Blooming” Arr. Sandra Eithun

AG35228; Level 2-; 3-5 Octaves Bells; Originally Released Fall 2004
Liturgical Season: Advent

Usage

This lovely setting of “Lo, How a Rose E’re Blooming” will find a welcome place in Advent services of most faith traditions. You can hear a recording, preview the music and order it for your bell choir from Lorenz: Order “Lo, How a Rose E’re Blooming”

Overview

Sandra does a wonderful job of pairing the tunes “Lo, How a Rose E’re Blooming” and “To a Wild Rose.” Her writing is clear and accessible, making this arrangement within the grasp of nearly any group. Following a simple chordal pattern and utilizing minimal bell changes and techniques, bell choirs can easily add this to gem to their repertoire with just a few rehearsals. 

Notes from Sandra

“When I was a young piano student, I always loved Edward MacDowell’s ‘To a Wild Rose.’ It was just a lovely, relaxing & thoughtful piece that was fun to play again and again. In contemplating scoring ‘Lo, How a Rose’ for handbells, I just messed around in my head with juxtaposing the two “rose-themed” pieces. I had to tweak the tunes here and there to make them work harmonically, but for the most part it wasn’t an issue. I did want to maintain the feeling of calm within the entirety of the piece.”

When asked about special suggestions for directors as they prepare this work, she replied to keep this setting tranquil and moving along.

What you should know about Sandra Eithun
  •         Sandra’s introduction to bells: “When I was hired to work in music ministry at my church in 1993, there were handbells stored in the basement of the church, as the director had been killed in a car accident a few years prior.  I took a handbell workshop sponsored by Bill Alexander and Strikepoint, and I was hooked!”
  •         What brought you to composing for bells:“I loved to do composition in my college years, mostly for flute or piano.  I thought I’d try my hand at bells since we did not have a huge budget at the time for new music. I never put my name on the music so that I could get unbiased feedback. Not that my young ringers paid attention to names on scores, but I did like being able to use my church group as a laboratory!”
  •         First Published composition: Gethsemane’s Prayer 
  •         Tell us about how you write: Today, I do write at the piano with my desktop computer.  Back in my college years, I always used staff paper. Occasionally, when I’m not in front of my piano, if I hear a tune in my head I’ll write it down in solfege until I have time to develop it later on. I have a home office, but I do write a lot in my head pretty much anywhere…driving, walking, trying to fall asleep (which is not always good because you can get stuck with an earworm!).”
  •       What you love most about composing: “I love that it’s different every day.  I love the challenge of trying to take a familiar hymn that you’ve heard over and over in several settings, and making something entirely different out of it.  It feels good to be able to inspire or move another person. My family is supportive of my composing…they like it that I wear my earphones!”
More info about Sandra
  • Sandra is married with four children and three grandchildren
  • She loves to cook, walk, and ice skate.
  • She enjoys working with church groups and her Silver Lake College group.
  • All four of her children were musicians throughout their school years. Mitchell Eithun has been very active in handbells and has several titles already in print. 
  • She admits she gets pretty animated in front of her TV during Green Bay Packer games!
“Lo, How A Rose” Background from Hymnary.org

Text: This hymn may date back as far as the fifteenth century, though the earliest manuscript was found in St. Alban’s Carthusian monastery in Trier and was dated around 1580. It was first published with twenty-three stanzas in Alte Catholische Geistliche Kirchengesange in 1599. Originally written in German and titled “Es ist ein Ros ensprungen,” the text combines the story of Christ’s birth with the prophecies in Isaiah about the “rose” from the “stem of Jesse.” The second verse originally interpreted “rose” to mean Mary, the mother of Jesus, but in 1609, Michael Praetorius changed the interpretation to point to Christ, thus fitting with the actual Biblical imagery. He then published the hymn with only stanzas one and two and added a harmonization. The first two verses were translated into English by Theodore Baker around 1894.

Tune: Paul Westermeyer writes that the tune ES IST EIN ROS “has the unusual capacity to lend itself equally well to both congregational and choral singing, with and without harmony in both cases” (Let the People Sing, 138). The Psalter Hymnal Handbook describes the harmony and rhythm as “subtle,” so it isn’t necessary to use much, if any, accompaniment. For a quirky folk version, check out Sufjan Steven’s banjo-led recording. Or, if you’re more a fan of rock and roll, Sting has a simple rendition featured in his “Life from Durham Cathedral” concert. There are multiple examples of a capella choral versions – in particular the Montverdi Choir’s German version.

See & Hear the Music

Until next month,

Brian Childers
Music Adviser

Return to top

This Month

Message from the National Seminar Planning Committee

Introducing Our New Business Membership – Coming Oct. 1

Video of the Month

Next Member-Chat

Members-only Site to Remain Open to All through June 30

Handbell Happy Hours Continue on Tuesdays & Thursdays

Brian’s Music Notes

SUBSCRIBE TO E-NOTES


National Events

GO HERE to find out more about all our national events.

Subscribe to our YouTube Channel to receive notifications about new videos and live streams.


 

Become a Sustaining Partner

Upgrade your membership to SUSTAINING PARTNER and play an important role in ensuring the future of Handbell Musicians of America. As a SUSTAINING PARTNER

  • You are CONNECTED to the handbell community
  • You are IN PARTNERSHIP with other handbell musicians
  • You are NURTURED through education and resources

Learn More


hf-logo-260px Help build a pension for the Guild, by contributing to the HERITAGE FUND

Announcements

HANDBELL MUSICIANS OF AMERICA MAILING ADDRESSES

Please note that any PAYMENTS sent to the Guild should now go to the following address:

Handbell Musicians of America PO Box 221047 Louisville, KY 40252

This includes membership renewal, contributions, event registration payments, invoice payments, etc.

All GENERAL CORRESPONDENCE that DOES NOT include a check payment should should be sent to:

Handbell Musicians of America 201 E. Fifth Street Suite 1900-1025 Cincinnati, OH 45202